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Currently Browsing: Results for Tag "semiconductors"

New programmable microcontroller runs on radio waves, can be reprogrammed in the field

New programmable microcontroller runs on radio waves, can be reprogrammed in the field A new research initiative between a University of Washington team and TU-Delft in the Netherlands has created a microprocessor that can power itself through stray radio waves and receive programmable updates in the same fashion.This has significant implications for Internet of Things development and for ambient computing as a whole.

How Intel lost $10 billion — and the mobile market

How Intel lost $10 billion — and the mobile market How did Intel manage to spend up to $10 billion dollars and have so little show for it?Three of these companies — GlobalFoundries, Samsung, and TSMC — are known as pure-play foundries or merchant foundries.

Japan’s SoftBank offers ARM a $32 billion buyout

Japan’s SoftBank offers ARM a $32 billion buyout UK-based ARM Holdings has dominated the cell phone industry for decades, with an estimated 50 billion ARM processors built by the year 2014.Now the company has been acquired by Japan’s SoftBank in a deal worth $32 billion (£24.

Moore’s law scaling dead by 2021, to be replaced by 3D integration

Moore’s law scaling dead by 2021, to be replaced by 3D integration Much of the ITRS’ recently released executive report focuses on the way the meaning of Moore’s law has changed over the years.We discussed this back in 2015 when we noted the need for a Moore’s law 3.

Seagate unveils the world’s largest SSD: 60TB

Seagate unveils the world’s largest SSD: 60TB The 60TB SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) SSD is intended for large-scale enterprise data centers that need maximum storage and compute performance.With just 17 of these drives, you can hit 1PB of storage; Seagate says it’s ideal for large local or cloud-based storage arrays, active archives, online video, and read-intensive environments.

Scientists create liquid light, get one step closer to spintronics

Scientists create liquid light, get one step closer to spintronics “We have made a field-effect light switch that can bridge the gap between optics and electronics,” says Dr.“We’re reaching the limits of how small we can make transistors, and electronics based on liquid light could be a way of increasing the power and efficiency of the electronics we rely on.

New carbon nanotube breakthrough moves them one step closer to mass production

New carbon nanotube breakthrough moves them one step closer to mass production One of the critical problems facing carbon nanotubes is the difficulty of putting them precisely where they’re needed.46 G0, which is seven times higher than previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods.

Samsung may be in talks with AMD, Nvidia to license graphics IP

Samsung may be in talks with AMD, Nvidia to license graphics IP Last year, the company announced it would bring its first custom CPU core to market in 2016.Now, it’s reportedly in talks with both AMD and Nvidia, looking for a graphics core to match its custom CPU.

GlobalFoundries announces new 7nm FinFET process, full node shrink

GlobalFoundries announces new 7nm FinFET process, full node shrink Even more interesting is the fact that the company intends to execute a full node shrink at 7nm, rather than using a hybrid node.A quick word on “full node” versus “hybrid node.

How neuromorphic ‘brain chips’ will begin the next era in computing

How neuromorphic ‘brain chips’ will begin the next era in computing Part of the reason a digital computer is more efficient than a human being is its transistors can fire with incredible speed — but so can our neurons.Similarly, we will eventually look back at the attempt to do learning operations with digital chips, including GPUs, as inherently unwise or even silly.

Qualcomm may acquire NXP Semiconductor in $30 billion deal

Qualcomm may acquire NXP Semiconductor in $30 billion deal Rumors suggest that Qualcomm might be planning to acquire NXP Semiconductor in a deal worth at least $30 billion.If Qualcomm is a high-profile success story that’s risen to dominate modem licensing and smartphone SoC design, NXP Semiconductor is the multi-billion dollar semiconductor company you haven’t heard of.

Scientists develop a memristor that can be conditioned just like a real synapse

Scientists develop a memristor that can be conditioned just like a real synapse The memristor is made of a silicon-oxygen-nitrogen material laced with clumps of silver nanoparticles at the electrical terminals.When current is applied across the memristor, the silver nanoparticles shuffle around within their parent oxynitride matrix, to line up within a lightning-bolt-like path of least electrical resistance.

The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to mathematicians working in Flatland

The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to mathematicians working in Flatland Michael Kosterlitz for “theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter.When cooled to just a few degrees above absolute zero, and subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field of 15 Tesla (just barely weaker than the magnetic field required to levitate a frog), that conductive 2D layer started acting very differently.

Samsung’s 10nm node, SoCs now in mass production

Samsung’s 10nm node, SoCs now in mass production According to Samsung, its 10nm LPE (Low Power Early) process node will offer “up to 30-percent increase in area efficiency with 27-percent higher performance or 40-percent lower power consumption.” Or this, from the company’s page on its 32nm process node.

New copper catalyst could close the carbon cycle, making ethanol from atmospheric CO2

New copper catalyst could close the carbon cycle, making ethanol from atmospheric CO2 In a quest to find a way to convert carbon dioxide into something useful, researchers from Oak Ridge National Labs in TN stumbled across an inexpensive, room-temperature catalyst for turning CO2 into ethanol.The new catalyst is made of copper nanoparticles, electroplated onto a substrate of vapor-deposited, nitrogen-doped graphene nanospikes, all atop a slice of n-type silicon semiconductor.

Why one small company thinks it has the key to extending Moore’s Law

Why one small company thinks it has the key to extending Moore’s Law One of the major differences between the various merchant foundries (GlobalFoundries, TSMC, Samsung, SMIC, UMC) and Intel is the process nodes they focus on.Intel has a fast-moving model that emphasizes moving to new nodes fairly quickly.

Samsung's mobile division profits fall by 96% in wake of Note 7 disaster

Samsung's mobile division profits fall by 96% in wake of Note 7 disaster In a separate meeting yesterday, Samsung President Shin Jong-kyun met with shareholders directly and gave some additional updates and disclosures related to the Note 7 disaster.As of this writing, Jet Black iPhone 7’s have a wait time of 2-3 weeks, while the same iPhone 7 Plus has an estimated wait time of 4-6 weeks.

Samsung announces fourth-gen 14nm node, plans 10nm improvements, and shows off 7nm EUV wafer

Samsung announces fourth-gen 14nm node, plans 10nm improvements, and shows off 7nm EUV wafer Like Intel, Samsung intends to offer multiple generations of a single process node — but unlike Intel, it isn’t debuting a new strategy in lieu of maintaining a quick transition roadmap.When foundries add new iterations of existing process nodes, it’s typically because they’ve got customers who are interested in those process nodes and want to take advantage of them.

Scientists develop a laser version of 'Maxwell's demon,' get closer to quantum computing

Scientists develop a laser version of 'Maxwell's demon,' get closer to quantum computing The researchers who did it believe this development will be useful for quantum computing.What makes this relevant to quantum computing is that the power to manipulate individual atoms makes it possible to induce quantum gates, to see if they’ll scale.

Nanotubes rear their tiny heads again, this time as a stamp for electronic inks

Nanotubes rear their tiny heads again, this time as a stamp for electronic inks A team at MIT has developed a high-tech stamping process that involves a “forest” of carbon nanotubes, capable of printing electronic inks onto almost any surface, whether rigid or flexible.When densely packed, nanotubes can act as nanoscale print heads for electronic inks.