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Currently Browsing: Results for Tag "retronaut"

The indigenous people of Papua New Guinea saved hundreds of wounded soldiers in WWII

The indigenous people of Papua New Guinea saved hundreds of wounded soldiers in WWII Deadlier than enemy fire, though, was the environment itself — far more Japanese died of starvation and disease than in combat.Numerous operations were hampered by the difficulties of maintaining supply lines through miles of thick jungle, steep slopes and swift rivers.

Before email, there was V-mail: The WWII program that scanned letters onto microfilm

Before email, there was V-mail: The WWII program that scanned letters onto microfilm The solution, based on the British Airgraph Service, was called Victory Mail — V-Mail for short.A V-mail letter would be written on a piece of standardized stationery, then photographed and transferred onto a roll of microfilm.

The badass bomber jackets of WWII airmen

The badass bomber jackets of WWII airmen The Type A-2 leather flight jacket — commonly called the “bomber jacket” — was standardized in 1931 as the jacket issued to U.Army Air Forces officers upon completion of basic flight training.

In 1939, evicted sharecroppers held a roadside protest that captivated the nation

In 1939, evicted sharecroppers held a roadside protest that captivated the nation In January 1939, motorists on highways in the “Bootheel” of southeastern Missouri began reporting a strange sight: thousands of sharecropper families were camped out on the roadside, their meager possessions piled around them, exposed to the wintry cold.The families, almost all African-American, had been evicted by the owners of the farms where they had lived.

Gorgeous hand-colored photos capture Japan on the brink of modernity

Gorgeous hand-colored photos capture Japan on the brink of modernity In the 1850s and ‘60s, Japan gradually loosened the restrictions on foreign trade and visitors which had isolated it for centuries.Western travelers and technologies began to flow in through a handful of ports, including Yokohama, where photographers such as Felice Beato opened studios to introduce photography to Japan.

How one sleepy town spent Saturday afternoon in the Great Depression

How one sleepy town spent Saturday afternoon in the Great Depression Founded in 1762, the small city of Hagerstown, Maryland sits just south of the Mason-Dixon line and changed hands several times during the Civil War.In October 1937, Farm Security Administration photographer Arthur Rothstein, in the course of his assignments covering everyday life across the country, passed through.

Homeless? Starving? Cheer up! These Great Depression billboards told poor Americans how lucky they were

Homeless? Starving? Cheer up! These Great Depression billboards told poor Americans how lucky they were In January 1937, while covering the disastrous flooding of the Ohio River in Louisville, Kentucky for LIFE Magazine, Margaret Bourke-White captured an image that quickly became famous and eventually rose to become an icon of the Great Depression.Though Bourke-White’s image was one-of-a-kind, the billboard was not.

1937: Alabama farmers find community in a good old-fashioned square dance

1937: Alabama farmers find community in a good old-fashioned square dance In the 1930s, the federal government established dozens of experimental cooperative farm settlements across the United States in an effort to provide relief and employment to farmers displaced by the Great Depression.One of these was Skyline Farms, located on 13,000 acres in Jackson County, Alabama.

A buried box of photos reveals a Jewish photographer's chronicle of life in the Lodz Ghetto

A buried box of photos reveals a Jewish photographer's chronicle of life in the Lodz Ghetto When Nazi Germany invaded Poland in 1939, they created walled-off ghettos in the larger cities to concentrate and imprison the Jewish residents.Henryk Ross worked as a news and sports photographer in the city of Lodz.

Striking images capture black life on Chicago's South Side in 1941

Striking images capture black life on Chicago's South Side in 1941 In the early decades of the 20th century, millions of African-Americans began leaving the rural South for the urban North in a mass exodus known as the Great Migration.For many fleeing the disenfranchisement, segregation, and racist violence of the Jim Crow South, the industrial hub of Chicago, with growing opportunities in the meatpacking and railroad businesses, offered the best prospects for self-determination.

Gritty 1939 photos capture the roughnecks of the East Texas Oil Field

Gritty 1939 photos capture the roughnecks of the East Texas Oil Field On Oct.The East Texas Oil Field, stretching some 45 miles long and five miles across, quickly attracted thousands of drillers and sprouted forests of oil derricks.

Cold beer and tons of free crab: Friday night at a 1938 Louisiana roadhouse

Cold beer and tons of free crab: Friday night at a 1938 Louisiana roadhouse During the Great Depression, the photographic unit of the Farm Security Administration assigned photographers to crisscross the country and record how people lived and worked throughout the nation.In September 1938, while traveling through Louisiana documenting sugar plantations, rice farmers, and oyster fishermen, photographer Russell Lee stopped off at Danos’ Nightclub, a roadhouse off Highway 1 in the tiny community of Raceland.

Anonymous found photos explore a century of hairstyles

Anonymous found photos explore a century of hairstyles These anonymous snapshots and found photos, acquired from a number of sources by collector Robert E.Jackson, have one subject in common: hair, in all its forms and permutations.

Incredible hand-tinted postcards capture 1890s Ireland in vivid color

Incredible hand-tinted postcards capture 1890s Ireland in vivid color These postcards of the sweeping hills, cliffs, and towns of Ireland were created using the Photochrom process, a complex method of imbuing black-and-white photographs with relatively realistic color.It entailed coating a tablet of lithographic limestone with a light-sensitive emulsion, then exposing it to sunlight under a photo negative.

Retro tech is huge right now because the present is a depressing nightmare

Retro tech is huge right now because the present is a depressing nightmare With that in mind, allow us to predict the next wave of retro tech surely hitting Amazon warehouse shelves any time now.Give it a bit more time, and we're sure the trend will extend to neon spandex and headbands.

An envelope in a Barcelona flea market held the work of an unknown master photographer

An envelope in a Barcelona flea market held the work of an unknown master photographer In the summer of 2001, American Tom Sponheim was vacationing in Barcelona with his wife.On their way to the cathedral of Sagrada Familia, they wandered through the bustling flea market of Els Encants.

Soviet propaganda posters warned citizens of the evils of alcohol

Soviet propaganda posters warned citizens of the evils of alcohol From the 1960s through the 1980s, artists throughout the Soviet Union designed propaganda posters to warn the public of the dangers of excessive alcohol consumption.With striking, colorful graphics and stark metaphors, the posters cast alcoholism as a snake choking the life from vivacious young men, a bottle as a prison, and more.

Rare color photos document the festivities at a 1941 state fair

Rare color photos document the festivities at a 1941 state fair First held in 1846, the Rutland State Fair in Rutland, Vermont is one of the oldest state fairs in the United States.With agricultural exhibitions, races, and rides, the fair drew massive crowds each year from around New England and New York, eventually being renamed the Vermont State Fair in 1972.

A returning WWII veteran captured an extraordinary photographic record of postwar NYC

A returning WWII veteran captured an extraordinary photographic record of postwar NYC In 1945, 40-year-old Todd Webb was discharged from the Navy and moved to New York City.Webb had cycled through a litany of professions before his service in the war.

Dreamlike color images of Petra and southern Jordan in the early 20th century

Dreamlike color images of Petra and southern Jordan in the early 20th century Built sometime around the 4th century BC, the city of Petra in southern Jordan was the capital of the Nabataean society.The Nabataeans carved elaborate and beautiful structures directly out of the raw sandstone cliffs, and devised ingenious cisterns and water conduits to make the city both a fortress and an oasis along the caravan trade routes of the region.