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Currently Browsing: Results for Tag "dna"

New technique not only detects cancer, it can pinpoint its location from blood samples

New technique not only detects cancer, it can pinpoint its location from blood samples They’ve called the computer program CancerLocator, and it simultaneously detects cancer and determines where in the body the cancer is located by analyzing a sample of the patient’s blood.“The cell-free DNAs are extracted from blood samples and subjected to DNA methylation profiling,” Jasmine Zhou, one of the researchers who leads the project, told Digital Trends.

Ancient DNA showcases a war between our hominid ancestors and viruses

Ancient DNA showcases a war between our hominid ancestors and viruses The study focuses on an ancient virus known as HERV-T, which began infecting primates some 32 to 43 million years ago.The germline cells like fetal cells, sperm progenitors, and eggs that were infected with HERV-T passed the viral genes down over the eons.

Anon seeks his ancestry

Anon seeks his ancestry E Anonymoused/ 26/ 1 7( : 37: 55 No.36571743sly?

Force Fields Become a Weapon in the Fight Against Prostate Cancer

Force Fields Become a Weapon in the Fight Against Prostate Cancer Scientists from the UK have figured out how to use a force field to separate cells, and it’s about to change prostate cancer research.One difference between normal and cancerous prostate cells is that where normal prostate cells use zinc to carry out their biologically ordained function, prostate cancers are devoid of zinc.

Single-Dose Radiation Found Effective for Prostate Cancer

Single-Dose Radiation Found Effective for Prostate Cancer Iridium also has isotopes that are useful in cancer treatment — and especially in prostate cancer treatment.The results of a two-year study from Europe have come in, concerning the use of iridium-192 in single-dose radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

DNA Double Feature: Scientists Replay Movie Stored in Molecules

DNA Double Feature: Scientists Replay Movie Stored in Molecules Scientists have successfully screened a movie recovered from the DNA of living cells.After translating a few frames from Muybridge’s film into DNA, researchers spent five days treating the bacteria, before reconstructing the movie with 90 percent accuracy.

Scientists just fit a GIF onto DNA, which might be the most important thing to ever happen to GIF-kind

Scientists just fit a GIF onto DNA, which might be the most important thing to ever happen to GIF-kind But now GIFs are making their way to a new frontier: scientists have finally figured out how to store and retrieve them from bacterial DNA.This means that the recording DNA can capture and replay events in the order in which they occurred.

The First App Store For Your DNA Is Here

The First App Store For Your DNA Is Here Some new insights might be added over time, but there’s not much else you can do with that genetic data.A startup called Helix is counting on people being curious enough to drop cash in its DNA app store on a regular basis.

Oregon Scientists First in US to Edit Human Embryos

Oregon Scientists First in US to Edit Human Embryos Still, Mitalipov’s work marks a milestone for the United States—the second country to successfully edit human embryos, after China.Some, like the US National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, believe modified human embryos should be allowed—as long as researchers follow strict criteria.

CRISPR Used to Genetically Modify Human Embryo in the US

CRISPR Used to Genetically Modify Human Embryo in the US Researchers in the US have limited CRISPR experiments on the human genome, but for the first time, a US team has successfully edited a human embryo with CRISPR.In doing so, the scientists at Oregon Health and Science University also showed CRISPR has the potential to eliminate genetic diseases.

Biological Teleporter Could Transmit Life to Other Planets

Biological Teleporter Could Transmit Life to Other Planets That may be possible in the not-too-distant future, according to Synthetic Genomics, a company founded in 2005 by famed geneticist Craig Venter.The company has just unveiled an experimental version of the “digital-to-biological converter.

Scientists Edit Human Embryos to Curb Disease

Scientists Edit Human Embryos to Curb Disease US scientists successfully edited human embryos to remove faulty DNA that causes hereditary heart disease.“Current treatment options for HCM provide mostly symptomatic relief without addressing the genetic cause of the disease,” according to the paper.

Hackers of the future could use malware stored in DNA to infect computers

Hackers of the future could use malware stored in DNA to infect computers "We have no evidence to believe that the security of DNA sequencing or DNA data in general is currently under attack.Instead, we view these results as a first step toward thinking about computer security in the DNA sequencing ecosystem," they said in a statement.

Researchers Write Malicious Code Into DNA, Infect the Computer That Reads It

Researchers Write Malicious Code Into DNA, Infect the Computer That Reads It From the what-could-possibly-go-wrong department: Scientists have now managed to write executable code into DNA that is theoretically capable of infecting the computer that reads it.It consists of replication instructions, encoded in a snippet of DNA that can deliver a payload capable of assuming control of the computer that reads the strand.

Scientists: Malware-Infused DNA Not Present Threat

Scientists: Malware-Infused DNA Not Present Threat “We wanted to understand what new computer security risks are possible in the interaction between biomolecular information and the computer systems that analyze it,” according to the multidisciplinary team.The group designed a malware-infused synthetic DNA strand, which, when sequenced by the compromised computer, gave remote control of the program.

Why some people can't handle coffee

Why some people can't handle coffee While java love is widespread, some people can't handle the jittery effects of coffee.Why is it that some people can chug coffee like water while others can't have a single sip without feeling like their hearts are going to pop out of their chest?