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Currently Browsing: Results for Tag "dna"

Researchers discover a virus that makes the toxin from black widow spider venom

Researchers discover a virus that makes the toxin from black widow spider venom Biotechnologists have discovered some horrifying new consequences of lateral gene transfer: a virus that started making the toxin from black widow spider venom, all by itself.It’s even less comforting that the virus acquired the ability to make the black widow toxin all on its own.

Genetic Sudoku is here, and it vastly speeds genomic analysis

Genetic Sudoku is here, and it vastly speeds genomic analysis The innovation has to do with one of the most powerful techniques in genetic analysis: whole genome knockout collections.Expose enough bacteria and you can be assured that you’ve got a mutation into every gene in an organism.

Scientists figure out how to tweak plant genomes to boost photosynthesis

Scientists figure out how to tweak plant genomes to boost photosynthesis Ample sunlight is good…except when there’s too much of it, which can cause damage to the plant’s cells.As the sun moves across the sky, changes in light can leave many leaves in the shade with a depressed rate of photosynthesis.

500 people squeezed into the world's most epic family photo

500 people squeezed into the world's most epic family photo This has got to be the most incredible family photo, period.500 descendants from one man — all with the same family name, Ren — gathered in an eastern Chinese village to take this epic group shot: In the photo are the 25th to 31st generations of this family from Shishecun, in Zhejiang.

Researchers retrieve short film and a full operating system from strands of DNA

Researchers retrieve short film and a full operating system from strands of DNA Not only is it easy to read and write vast amounts of data on DNA, it’s also exceptionally stable and can last for hundreds of thousands of years.If that data could be stored on DNA, it could fit into a grain of pollen.

Researchers increase the storage capacity of DNA to 214 petabytes per gram

Researchers increase the storage capacity of DNA to 214 petabytes per gram Now a pair of researchers from Columbia University and the New York Genome Center have developed a process for storing 214 petabytes of data per gram of DNA.It’s data storage just like what we do with hard drives, but with much higher potential density.

Scientists store digital files in an unlikely place: DNA

Scientists store digital files in an unlikely place: DNA The idea with digital data is to take advantage of this dense, compact DNA structure and fill it with other types of information.They compressed those data files into one master file, then split the data into short strings of binary code made of ones and zeros.

22 photos that prove science is beautiful

22 photos that prove science is beautiful It's the 20th anniversary of the Wellcome Images Awards, which celebrates images of science and medicine.Their winners’ gallery features the most diverse range of images the contest's history.

New GOP bill lets companies force you to take genetic tests, lets them share results with third parties

New GOP bill lets companies force you to take genetic tests, lets them share results with third parties A new bill introduced by Virginia Foxx (R-NC) and approved by the House Ways and Means Committee would allow corporations to force employees to undergo genetic testing — and then share those results with third parties.But HR 1313 goes farther than simply allowing genetic profiling of employees because an employer offers insurance coverage.

New technique not only detects cancer, it can pinpoint its location from blood samples

New technique not only detects cancer, it can pinpoint its location from blood samples They’ve called the computer program CancerLocator, and it simultaneously detects cancer and determines where in the body the cancer is located by analyzing a sample of the patient’s blood.“The cell-free DNAs are extracted from blood samples and subjected to DNA methylation profiling,” Jasmine Zhou, one of the researchers who leads the project, told Digital Trends.

Ancient DNA showcases a war between our hominid ancestors and viruses

Ancient DNA showcases a war between our hominid ancestors and viruses The study focuses on an ancient virus known as HERV-T, which began infecting primates some 32 to 43 million years ago.The germline cells like fetal cells, sperm progenitors, and eggs that were infected with HERV-T passed the viral genes down over the eons.

Anon seeks his ancestry

Anon seeks his ancestry E Anonymoused/ 26/ 1 7( : 37: 55 No.36571743sly?

Force Fields Become a Weapon in the Fight Against Prostate Cancer

Force Fields Become a Weapon in the Fight Against Prostate Cancer Scientists from the UK have figured out how to use a force field to separate cells, and it’s about to change prostate cancer research.One difference between normal and cancerous prostate cells is that where normal prostate cells use zinc to carry out their biologically ordained function, prostate cancers are devoid of zinc.

Single-Dose Radiation Found Effective for Prostate Cancer

Single-Dose Radiation Found Effective for Prostate Cancer Iridium also has isotopes that are useful in cancer treatment — and especially in prostate cancer treatment.The results of a two-year study from Europe have come in, concerning the use of iridium-192 in single-dose radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

DNA Double Feature: Scientists Replay Movie Stored in Molecules

DNA Double Feature: Scientists Replay Movie Stored in Molecules Scientists have successfully screened a movie recovered from the DNA of living cells.After translating a few frames from Muybridge’s film into DNA, researchers spent five days treating the bacteria, before reconstructing the movie with 90 percent accuracy.

Scientists just fit a GIF onto DNA, which might be the most important thing to ever happen to GIF-kind

Scientists just fit a GIF onto DNA, which might be the most important thing to ever happen to GIF-kind But now GIFs are making their way to a new frontier: scientists have finally figured out how to store and retrieve them from bacterial DNA.This means that the recording DNA can capture and replay events in the order in which they occurred.