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Currently Browsing: Results for Tag "ceres"

Where are all the large impact craters on Ceres?

Where are all the large impact craters on Ceres? Astronomers agree with you — most of the rocks in our asteroid belt look pretty careworn.So they expected that when NASA’s Dawn spacecraft got to Ceres, they would see similarly many large impact craters marring the dwarf planet’s surface, just like every other rocky thing in our entire solar system.

This week in space: Ceres, Io, and an interesting answer to the Fermi paradox

This week in space: Ceres, Io, and an interesting answer to the Fermi paradox From exoplanet research and Io’s unusual atmosphere to triple supernovas, it’s been an interesting week.From Harvard this week comes a compelling and evidence-based answer to the evergreen question: if there’s life beyond our planet, where is it?

The week in space: A failed Milky Way, a shadow Planet 9 and an earth-shattering kaboom

The week in space: A failed Milky Way, a shadow Planet 9 and an earth-shattering kaboom It’s still sending us photos from Ceres, well after its planned EOL, and NASA intends to wring out every bit of science it can.Speaking of cold, dark things that are unhelpfully far away and difficult to observe, scientists presented evidence for another planetoid in our solar system, dubbed Planet 9 (from outer space!

NASA releases new image of mysterious bright spots on dwarf planet Ceres

NASA releases new image of mysterious bright spots on dwarf planet Ceres Depending on how you want to define a planet, Ceres could almost be a fit.Most recently, Dawn moved to an altitude of 960 miles (1480 kilometers), which is how the latest images of the bright spots were captured.

NASA says dwarf planet Ceres has plenty of water ice

NASA says dwarf planet Ceres has plenty of water ice That doesn’t mean Ceres is lacking in water ice.On its way to Ceres, the ion engine-powered craft swing by the asteroid Vesta.

The year in space: Supernovas, gravitational waves, theoretical planets, and Hammer pants

The year in space: Supernovas, gravitational waves, theoretical planets, and Hammer pants The Great Observatory is still going strong after its 2009 tuneup, and now the Space Telescope Science Institute has a little bit more scratch to keep the Hubble project running until 2021.This year, the International Space Station made its 100,000th orbit around our planet.

The building blocks of life are much more common than we thought

The building blocks of life are much more common than we thought There are six chemical elements common to all known life: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur.But silicon is such a heavy atom that thermodynamics seems to look sternly upon the idea of silicon-based life.

This week in space: rockets, telescopes, and exoplanets

This week in space: rockets, telescopes, and exoplanets At the ESO facility in the Atacama, one of their telescopes is named TRAPPIST, in homage to the monks.That telescope was used to discover seven earthlike exoplanets around TRAPPIST-1, a nearby ultracool dwarf star.

A cryovolcano might be erupting right now on Ceres, as you read this

A cryovolcano might be erupting right now on Ceres, as you read this It couldn’t have been a regular volcano, not on iceball Ceres.Not only is Ahuna Mons a cryovolcano, which spews volatile compounds like ammonia or water instead of lava, it’s a young one — and it could be erupting, right now.

This week in space: SpaceX, Blue Origin, and still no aliens

This week in space: SpaceX, Blue Origin, and still no aliens SpaceX just announced that its Falcon 9 rocket will carry EchoStar 23 into space next week.Blue Origin unveiled their new reusable heavy-lift rocket, christened the New Glenn.