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Currently Browsing: Results for Tag "bose"

Bose gets serious about wireless headphones, debuts 4 wildly different models

However, if there's a modern audio gadget Bose isn't strong on, it's wireless headphones.95), which looks and feels like a wireless version of the company's current noise-canceling over-the-ear headphones, the QC25.

Bose unveils its first wireless noise-canceling headphones, the QuietComfort 35

After more than a decade of QuietComfort headphones, Bose has unveiled the flagship QuietComfort 35, the successor to the wired QC25 and the first version that’s wireless and contains active noise-canceling circuitry.But Bose is arguably the most recognizable name in noise canceling, and has held out on releasing a wireless version for a long time (although it has released wireless headphones without noise cancellation before).

Bose’s latest speaker is a DIY building kit for kids and inquisitive adults

Bose’s latest speaker is a DIY building kit for kids and inquisitive adults Their new Cube speaker, however, is all about bringing STEM learning to kids.The Cube is a DIY Bluetooth speaker building kit.

Lawsuit alleges Bose backed Doppler Labs to gain access to its tech

Lawsuit alleges Bose backed Doppler Labs to gain access to its tech In a lawsuit filed in Bose’s home state of Massachusetts, Doppler Labs is alleging that this is more than a coincidence.The filing alleges that Bose made attempts to gain early access to Doppler’s Here Active Listening system and Here One headphones, with the complaint specifically fingering Bose executive Chris Miller.

Bose boasts its 360-degree Revolve and Revolve+ are its best Bluetooth speakers yet

Bose boasts its 360-degree Revolve and Revolve+ are its best Bluetooth speakers yet On Thursday, Bose announced its new SoundLink Revolve and SoundLink Revolve+, both of which use a cylindrical design to deliver 360-degree sound.Instead, the speakers use a downward-firing transducer and new patented acoustic deflector, along with a pair of dual-opposing passive radiators.

Bose accused of spying on end users, data mining their private records via headphone app

Bose accused of spying on end users, data mining their private records via headphone app According to plaintiff Kyle Zak, the spying began when Bose released a mandatory Bose Connect application that all users must install to “fully operate its wireless products.” What Bose didn’t draw much attention to, according to the suit, is that Bose Connect collects data on all the musical content or audio books that you listen to on its headphones.

Bose allegedly collected and sold personal user data, including listening habits

Bose allegedly collected and sold personal user data, including listening habits A complaint filed on Tuesday by Kyle Zak claims that Bose not only tracks the listening habits of users of the headphones, but sells that information without permission, Reuters reports.” After buying the QC35 headphones — which retail for $350 — Zak installed the Bose Connect app, which the company says enhances the listening experience.

Lawsuit claims Bose is selling data collected by Connect audio app

Lawsuit claims Bose is selling data collected by Connect audio app They’re working overtime at “Building 8,” Facebook’s skunkworks where they’re working on myriad new ways to get you to use Facebook, of course.Really, they’re actually working hard on this.

Bose is acting shady with its headphones, lawsuit claims

Bose is acting shady with its headphones, lawsuit claims Turns out headphones might be as good at picking up information as they are at sending music into your earholes.An Illinois man filed a class-action lawsuit on Tuesday that claims his Bose QuietComfort 35 wireless Bluetooth headphones — in conjunction with the corresponding Bose Connect app — collected the songs and other tracks he listened to and matched that information to an identification number linked to him.

Your headphones aren't spying on you, but your apps are. Here's why.

Your headphones aren't spying on you, but your apps are. Here's why. Lawyers in the US are claiming that headphone and speaker company Bose, is secretly collecting information about what users listen to when they use its bluetooth wireless headphones.The app allows customers to interact with the headphones, updating software and also managing which device is connected at any time with the headphones.

Move over UE Boom, there’s a new (actually old) kid in town

Move over UE Boom, there’s a new (actually old) kid in town There are two models in the series - the Soundlink Revolve and the Soundlink Revolve+ - and Bose assures they provide truly omnidirectional performance, with sound in every direction from a seamless aluminium design.” Despite this, when you’re at the beach, on the lawn enjoying a drink or perhaps even on a worksite, the speaker you’re most likely to see is a UE Boom.