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Currently Browsing: Results for Tag "biology"

Scientists find another reason to cut your sugar intake: Alzheimer's disease

Scientists find another reason to cut your sugar intake: Alzheimer's disease researchers say they've spotted the molecular "tipping point" that could explain sugar's ties to Alzheimer's disease.Their findings provide further evidence that there might be a link between high blood sugar levels and the memory-robbing disease, though they don't prove that sugar causes Alzheimer's outright.

Here's another way to bury your pet — grow it into a tree

Here's another way to bury your pet — grow it into a tree Grow your loved one's remains into a remembrance tree thanks to the 'Living Urn'.The system works by placing your loved ones remains into the bio urn, adding a special root protection formula, as well as a growth mix.

Newly discovered rock formations could be fossils from earliest living organisms

Newly discovered rock formations could be fossils from earliest living organisms 5 billion years ago, and a new discovery in Canada indicates life developed not long after.28 billion years ago.

Researchers increase the storage capacity of DNA to 214 petabytes per gram

Researchers increase the storage capacity of DNA to 214 petabytes per gram Now a pair of researchers from Columbia University and the New York Genome Center have developed a process for storing 214 petabytes of data per gram of DNA.It’s data storage just like what we do with hard drives, but with much higher potential density.

The mystery of why pandas are black and white has been solved

The mystery of why pandas are black and white has been solved We finally know why pandas are black and white.They're a study in contrasts, with black fur that matches dark forests and white fur for snow-filled landscapes.

22 photos that prove science is beautiful

22 photos that prove science is beautiful It's the 20th anniversary of the Wellcome Images Awards, which celebrates images of science and medicine.Their winners’ gallery features the most diverse range of images the contest's history.

Meet the fluorescent tree frogs of South America

Meet the fluorescent tree frogs of South America Scientists in Argentina and Brazil say they've found the first solid evidence of a fluorescent amphibian, courtesy of the South American tree frog.Their findings, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offer clues into how this tiny tree frog survives in its environment.

Snail foreplay finally gets the dedicated research it has long deserved

Snail foreplay finally gets the dedicated research it has long deserved Foreplay that can last several hours and is mostly smell-stuff, stabbing with love darts and genitals that are similar to a rubber glove?So wild that it can fill a four-minute video where truly, every second brings new and previously unimaginable information thanks to PBS's digital studio series, Deep Look.

Hacked-together Lego Mindstorms bot kit brings science to a classroom near you

Hacked-together Lego Mindstorms bot kit brings science to a classroom near you Stanford researchers have hacked the Lego Mindstorms platform as a springboard to create a liquid-handling robotics kit, using inexpensive, off-the-shelf parts.” To fill that vacuum, the team created their own desktop liquid-handling robots that approach the performance of the far more costly automation systems found at universities and biotech labs, Riedel-Kruse said.

These scientists turned spinach leaves into beating heart tissue

These scientists turned spinach leaves into beating heart tissue researchers found a way to use the veins of the spinach leaf to build a miniature version of a beating heart muscle.Next, they flowed fluids and microbeads similar in size to human blood cells through the spinach's veiny network.

Is a coconut a nut?

Is a coconut a nut? It might not be so obvious at first glance, but a coconut is technically a fruit, a general nut and a seed.The coconut belongs to a group of fruits called drupes.

The Hunt for Undiscovered Drugs at the Bottom of the Sea

The Hunt for Undiscovered Drugs at the Bottom of the Sea These samples could potentially yield new pharmaceutical compounds—and in turn, new chemical cures and desperately needed antibiotics that are yet undiscovered.“It was another world,” McPhail said, “with incredible sulfide spires and formations.

Study reveals a dystopian future in which brain stimulation helps keep us honest

Study reveals a dystopian future in which brain stimulation helps keep us honest A new study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that non-invasive brain stimulation can actually make us more honest.While still improbable, it revealed that people didn't lie as much.

Psychedelic shrimp with tons of sonic energy named after Pink Floyd

Psychedelic shrimp with tons of sonic energy named after Pink Floyd The newly discovered sea creature, from the tropical eastern Pacific near Panama, was named after the progressive rock band Pink Floyd, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Zootaxa.The shrimp can stun and even kill a small fish with its sonic energy, so it's fitting that it's named for a rock band.

Ancient DNA showcases a war between our hominid ancestors and viruses

Ancient DNA showcases a war between our hominid ancestors and viruses The study focuses on an ancient virus known as HERV-T, which began infecting primates some 32 to 43 million years ago.The germline cells like fetal cells, sperm progenitors, and eggs that were infected with HERV-T passed the viral genes down over the eons.

The world's fastest camera can capture 5 trillion frames per second

The world's fastest camera can capture 5 trillion frames per second A new camera developed in Sweden is faster than any photography gear on the planet.Conventional cameras, by contrast, top out at around 100,000 frames per second With the new high-speed film camera, the researchers plan to film rapid processes in chemistry, biology, and physics that are otherwise impossible to capture in photos or videos.

Scientists Find Molecular 'Key' to Killing Hearty Bacteria

Scientists Find Molecular 'Key' to Killing Hearty Bacteria Scientists from the University of Illinois have learned how to attach a molecular “key” to narrow-spectrum antibiotics, thereby making them much more effective.The LPS layer protects gram-negative bacteria from most antibiotics, but the University of Illinois team claims to have found a way to bypass it.