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Currently Browsing: Results for Tag "Brain"

Scientists develop a memristor that can be conditioned just like a real synapse

Scientists develop a memristor that can be conditioned just like a real synapse The memristor is made of a silicon-oxygen-nitrogen material laced with clumps of silver nanoparticles at the electrical terminals.When current is applied across the memristor, the silver nanoparticles shuffle around within their parent oxynitride matrix, to line up within a lightning-bolt-like path of least electrical resistance.

New probe measures electrical activity of hundreds of individual neurons in living brains

New probe measures electrical activity of hundreds of individual neurons in living brains To move beyond historically difficult and damaging methods of taking these readings, researchers from Caltech have demonstrated a minimally invasive probe for doing in vivo electrophysiology: real-time electrical recordings of living nerves in the brain.The probe can measure electrical activity in three dimensions, which could be a huge breakthrough for our understanding of cognition and neural activity.

Scientists discover nature's algorithm for intelligence

Scientists discover nature's algorithm for intelligence Throughout the ages, one old chestnut has stubbornly resisted yielding up its secret: the organizational principle behind the human brain.Joe Tsien, think they may be onto the answer with a recent paper published in the journal Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience.

Groundbreaking fMRI study finds 4 distinct neurological subtypes of depression

Groundbreaking fMRI study finds 4 distinct neurological subtypes of depression The study captured fMRI brain scans from more than a thousand participants, in order to answer a question: What’s different between the brains of healthy people and those with depression?The authors refer to the axes as a shared pathological core, by which we can understand the relationship between brain connectivity and the symptoms of depression.

The brains of astronauts change during spaceflight

The brains of astronauts change during spaceflight At the dawn of human spaceflight, we weren’t even sure people would be able to eat in space.Today, we’ve moved on to bigger questions like, “what happens to your brain in space?

Scientists Grow Mini Blood Vessels in Mini Brains

Scientists Grow Mini Blood Vessels in Mini Brains Scientists at Brown University have created mini brains that grow mini blood vessels.“This is exciting because real brains have vasculature,” Diane Hoffman-Kim, associate professor at Brown and senior author of the study, said in a statement.

Brain cells, beware: Researchers have created the world smallest hammer

Brain cells, beware: Researchers have created the world smallest hammer The world’s smallest hammer has been created to study what happens to brain cells when we hit our head.” Along with Megan Valentine, Adele Doyle, and research student Luke Patterson, Foster will study how impact affects neural stem cells.

Freaky new experiment shows neuroscientists exactly how the human brain processes fear

Freaky new experiment shows neuroscientists exactly how the human brain processes fear A new study published in the journal Nature Communications describes an investigation designed to reveal how the human brain processes fear and anxiety — and how this data could be used to help treat mental health disorders.Imagine a scientific version of a YouTube reaction video, and you’re not far off the mark!

U.S. Army wants to keep you alert at the wheel by reading your brain waves

U.S. Army wants to keep you alert at the wheel by reading your brain waves Well, forget about cranking loud music, drinking convenience store coffee, and keeping your windows rolled down, because the United States Army has an alternative solution: reading your brain waves.“Since EEG signals directly measure the brain activities, theoretically EEG based approaches should be more reliable [than other solutions],” co-author Dr.

Scientists genetically engineer a mouse that is immune to cocaine addiction

Scientists genetically engineer a mouse that is immune to cocaine addiction Scientists at the University of British Columbia genetically engineered a mouse that is incapable of becoming addicted to cocaine.More: Swedish researchers develop breathalyzer that detects pot and cocaine “We have a cage with three very distinct chambers in it,” Bamji continued.

Algorithm predicts autism diagnosis in young children with 81 percent accuracy

Algorithm predicts autism diagnosis in young children with 81 percent accuracy The algorithm was able to predict with 81 percent accuracy whether a diagnosis of autism would be made for a child with an autistic sibling,.By scanning their brains at 6 months old,  a year old, and 2 years old, they were able to make some interesting discoveries.