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New Windows 10 build kills controversial password-sharing Wi-Fi Sense

When Microsoft announced Windows 10, it added a feature called Wi-Fi Sense that had previously debuted on the Windows Phone operating system. Wi-Fi Sense was a password-sharing option that allowed you to share Wi-Fi passwords with your friends and contacts in Skype, Outlook, and Facebook. Here’s how Microsoft described the feature last year:

“When you share Wi-Fi network access with Facebook friends, contacts, or Skype contacts, they’ll be connected to the password-protected Wi-Fi networks that you choose to share and get Internet access when they’re in range of the networks (if they use Wi-Fi Sense). Likewise, you’ll be connected to Wi-Fi networks that they share for Internet access too. Remember, you don’t get to see Wi-Fi network passwords, and you both get Internet access only. They won’t have access to other computers, devices, or files stored on your home network, and you won’t have access to these things on their network.”

There were security concerns related to Windows 10’s management of passwords and whether or not said passwords could be intercepted on the fly. To our knowledge, no security breaches or problems were associated with Wi-Fi Sense. According to Microsoft, few people actually used the feature and some were actively turning it off. “The cost of updating the code to keep this feature working combined with low usage and low demand made this not worth further investment,” said Gabe Aul, Microsoft’s Windows Insider czar.

These changes are incorporated into the latest build of Windows, Windows 10 Insider Preview 14342. Other changes in this build include:

Microsoft has also fixed playback errors with DRM-protected content from Groove Music, Microsoft Movies & TV, Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, and Hulu. The company fixed audio crashes for users who play audio to a receiver using S/PDIF or HDMI while using Dolby Digital Live or DTS Connect, and fixed some bugs that prevented common keyboard commands like Ctrl-C, Ctrl-V, or Alt-Space from working in Windows 10 apps. Full details on the changes and improvements to the build can be found here.

One final note:  Earlier this year, we theorized that Microsoft might extend the free upgrade period longer than the July 29 cutoff, especially if it was serious about hitting its 1 billion user target. The company has since indicated that it has no plans to continue offering Windows 10 for free after July 29. If you want to upgrade to Windows 10 or are still on the fence about whether or not to accept Microsoft’s offer, you only have a little over two months to make the decision.

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