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Bravely Second, SNES classics hit Nintendo 3DS eShop

A trio of SNES classics hit New Nintendo 3DS portables this week as part of Nintendo’s latest eShop update, including all-time greats like The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and Super Metroid.

This week’s eShop lineup also hosts the launch of Square Enix’s portable RPG series sequel Bravely Second: End Layer, along with Wii U standouts like Paranautical Activity and Brain Age.

Related: Here are the top 25 games that made the SNES, well, super

Starting today, New Nintendo 3DS owners can download The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy’s Kong Quest, and Super Metroid from the eShop for $8 apiece. All three games are staples of the SNES console library, and were previously released via the Wii and Wii U’s Virtual Console service.

This week’s retro lineup bolsters the New Nintendo 3DS’s Virtual Console library following Nintendo’s recent introduction of SNES titles. The platform previously hosted emulated versions of 16-bit classics like Earthbound, Super Mario World, F-Zero, and Pilotwings.

Elsewhere on the eShop this week, Square Enix’s Bravely Second serves as a direct follow-up to 2014’s turn-based RPG Bravely Default: Flying Fairy, expanding on the original game’s structure with overhauled combat mechanics and redesigned characters. The game’s prologue chapter is currently available as a free demo via the eShop, allowing players to give the game a test drive and later carry over their progress to the full version.

Additional 3DS games premiering via the eShop this week include the strategy-RPG Langrisser Re:Incarnation, summer sports sim Super Strike Beach Volleyball, and Excave III: Tower of Destiny, a roguelike RPG in the vein of ChunSoft’s Mystery Dungeon series.

The Wii U also hosts a broad lineup of digital releases this week, including undersea shooter Paranautical Activity, turn-based RPG Asdivine Hearts, sketchpad puzzler Draw 2 Survive, and a Virtual Console adaptation of 2006’s Nintendo DS brain-training app Brain Age.

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